Riverton grad awarded Governor General's Medal

Aynslee Hurdal was awarded as one of two the lead design architects for her work on Parallelogram House with a Governor General’s Medal for Architecture that went to 5468796 Architecture in Winnipeg this year. Photo submitted by Aynslee Hurdal

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Another Riverton graduate has made her parents proud. Aynslee Hurdal was awarded the Governor General’s Medal in Architecture for her work on Parallelogram House in the RM of East St. Paul on Sept. 13.

The now Ontario based architect grew up in Arnes and went to school in Riverton. She graduated from Riverton Collegiate Institute in 1994. Her parents are Norman and Phyllis Hurdal, who said they are both very proud of their daughter’s accomplishment.

Hurdal was one of two lead design architects, alongside Sasa Radulovic. While both Radulovic and Hurdal were noted as the project’s leads, the project’s award went to 5468796 Architecture.

The exterior of Parallelogram House stands in contrast to its stucco-clad neighbours as the design was in response to the run-of-the-mill houses beside it, according to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Submitted photo by James Brittain Photography

5468796 Architecture’s project, Parallelogram House in East St. Paul was designed with the owners in mind. Submitted photo by James Brittain Photography

In contrast to its outer palette of wood and steel, the house has a darkly grounded, exterior and a bright, modern interior. Submitted photo by James Brittain Photography

In an attempt to introduce architectural rigour into unlikely surroundings, this unique home is situated on a suburban street in the RM of East St. Paul, according to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Submitted photo by James Brittain Photography

“The house speaks for itself,” she said. “Architecture is a team effort and this project was successful on many levels.”

According to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, Parallelogram House’s construction budget was $900,000.

“At once radical and subtle, Parallelogram House experiments with the context of ordinary suburban architecture,” the Jury said. “Its diagonal facades front and back afford more expansive and yet more private view lines than the ubiquitous and non-private in-line siting of houses in residential neighbourhoods. Its use of steel fins provides a provocative alternative both in material and form to the predictable and banal materials that are more common to the programme. This is domestic architecture that challenges its paradigm, and yet with its single-story height and earth-toned façade, it maintains a low profile.”

During construction, the house was a concern for many nearby residents, according to RAIC, however, its quiet repose has won over most of them.

Hurdal was one of 12 recipients  The award was announced earlier this year and the official ceremony was held in Winnipeg, as opposed to Ottawa.

For more information, visit raic.org.

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