Grain producers, vendors flock to Arborg

A scaled-down OPI Blue, a wireless system that delivers tiimely grain storage information to your mobile device, is displayed by Valley Services Ltd. duringthe annual Arborg Grain Information Day at the Arborg Bifrost Community Centre on March 14. Nathan Liewicki / Interlake Spectator

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ARBORG — Spring is on the horizon and with that comes the reality that crop producers will soon be planting seeds for the upcoming season.

Dozens of farmers attended the Arborg Grain Information Day, which was jointly put on by Manitoba Agriculture and the Northern Interlake Conservation Effort, at the Arborg Bifrost Community Centre on March 14.

Approximately 25 vendors came out to the annual event, which Babatunde Nuga, an agriculture extension co-ordinator for the industry advancement branch of Manitoba Agriculture, said is huge for producers.

“It gives an opportunity for a one-stop-shop,” he told The Interlake Spectator. “Apart from the producers getting to know the best farming practices, they are able to interact with industry members, and these are people who are into fertilizers, equipment, various agronomy practices, the insurance and (finances).”

“Instead of travelling to Stonewall or travelling to Winnipeg, the producers are able to interact with people in the industry in one place,” he added.

In addition to interactions with the myriad of vendors, farmers had the opportunity to listen to up to six people give 45-minute presentations on a variety of topics throughout the day. These included soil health with Manitoba Agriculture’s oilseed crop specialist Dane Froese; land and rent values with Manitoba Agriculture farm enterprise management specialist Darren Bond; and soybean agronomy research and intercropping with Kristen MacMillan, a University of Manitoba research agronomist that focuses on soybean and pulse crop agronomy and
cropping systems.

“The effect of seed depth can depend on the environment,” she stressed to farmers.

“Interactions can be not-so-useful for farmers because it depends on the environment. That’s why I like presenting the main effect of seed depth,” MacMillan continued. “(Research shows) staying between a half-inch and an inch-and-a-half is the most consistent, even in these dry conditions.”

Kristen MacMillan, a University of Manitoba research agronomist specializing in soybean and pulse crop agronomy and cropping systems, gives a presentation on intercropping and soybean agronomy research during the annual Arborg Grain Information Day at the Arborg Bifrost Community Centre on March 14. Nathan Liewicki / Interlake Spectator

Nuga hopes this year’s Grain Information Day will result in producers taking what they learned in Arborg and applying potentially newer and better practices that will turn produce greater crop yields.

U of M scholarship deadline approaching

The University of Manitoba’s agricultural and food sciences centennial entrance scholarship is still seeking appplicants for 11 scholarships worth $2,000 each, to students interested in pursuing a degree or diploma in the faculty.

The deadline to apply is April 1, with submissions being made to Nuga via email: babatunde.nuga@gov.mb.ca.

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